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Presentation of the HUMAN DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2004

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The Human Development Report 2004, was elaborated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), on the 15th July 2004 with the collaboration of, among others, Amartya Sen (Nobel Prize for Economics 1988 and one of the creatores of the Report on Human Development), Nelson Mandela (ex president of South Africa) and Shirin Evad (winner of the Nobel Peace Prize 2003)

Each year, since 1990, the UNDP has charged an independent team of experts with the drafting of the Report on Human Development so as to examine themes of world significance. A world network of advisors composed of professionals from academic, governmental and civil society fields contribute with data, ideas and good practices to support the analysis and public proposals of the report.

The Index of Human Development (IDH) is designed to measure the advances made in each country with respect to three basic dimensions of human development: life expectancy; education, measured by the average number of literate adults and the number of individuals enrolled in primary, secondary and tertiary education.

In the present edition the report focuses on cultural liberty in todays diverse world, underlining it as one of the most essential elements of human development and a basic instrument for the reinforcement of democracy and political stability.

With its focus on the Millennium Development Goals, the report analizes migratory movements on an international level, cultural, lingusitic and religious diversity and the design and implementation of pluriculturual policies.

In this respect the Human Development Report 2004 covers a broad spectrum of public policies in areas ranging from bilingual education and positive discrimination plans to innovative systems of proportional representation and federalism.

The authors maintain that all individuals have the right to maintain their ethnic, linguistic and religious identities. The application of policies that recognise and protect these identities is the only sustainable way of achieving development in multicultural societies. They maintain that globalization cannot be successful unless cultural liberties are protected and respected, and unless the xenophobic positions that resist cultural diversity are conquered.

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With the support of
Bizkaiko Foru Aldundia / Diputación Foral de Bizkaia

Eusko Jaurlaritza / Gobierno Vasco